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I got a new job this summer. After 20 years, I left the television news business to become… a librarian!

Well, not really. In fact, real librarians will get mad at me for even suggesting I am worthy enough to carry the title.

I am now working in the marketing department of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. One of the oldest and most innovative libraries in the nation, you may have heard about it-or seen photos of it-thanks to this Buzzfeed post which went viral the week I started working there. I can’t take credit for it… but it was an awesome way to start my new career.

One of the most fabulous perks of my new job is that I get a lunch hour. Sometimes I spend my lunch hour in the rare books room, also known as the Joseph C. Stearn Cincinnati Room, just a short walk from my office. It is my favorite room in the library. Home to our 1848 daguerreotype of the Cincinnati Riverfront, and rotating, museum-type displays, it is where a history nutcase like myself can go to feed a soul yearning to touch the past.

Our library has an entire collection of rare materials which ANYONE can access. There are copies of Gallileo’s work, Syrian tables dating to the ages before Christ, a whole host of ancient texts from a number of religious denominations, and a first-edition print of Jane Austen’s first novel Sense and Sensibility. That was my first lunch hour choice and it was pretty darn thrilling.

First edition, published in 1811, paid for by Jane because the publisher had no faith that it would sell.

First edition, published in 1811, paid for by Jane because the publisher had no faith that it would sell.

But I hit a home run with my second selection and it was so fantastic, I decided to blog about it, even though it’s not food related. Because if you love and appreciate history, especially English Tudor history, you’ll understand why I was giddy for hours after handling this book.

This is the Great Bible, published in 1541. It’s bound in the original cowhide leather with iron hinges. It probably weighs 25 pounds. It’s gigantic and musty and it doesn’t look like much at first glance.

The outer cover is made of cow hide leather with iron hinges and decoration. It was printed and assembled in 1541.

The outer cover is made of cow hide leather with iron hinges and decoration. It was printed and assembled in 1541. But when you open it, it takes your breath away.The first page I flipped to in the Great Bible 

The first page I flipped to in the Great Bible

The Great Bible was authorized by King Henry VIII of England and was the first edition of the Bible in English to be read aloud in the church services of the Church of England. The Great Bible was prepared by Myles Coverdale, working under commission of Thomas, Lord Cromwell, Secretary to Henry VIII and Vicar General. In 1538, Cromwell directed the clergy to provide “one book of the bible of the largest volume in English, and the same set up in some convenient place within the said church that ye have care of, whereas your parishioners may most commodiously resort to the same and read it.”

It’s so common to have Bibles in churches, homes, and hotels in this modern time that many people don’t realize the book itself is not very old, when you consider the entire life of the church.  The printing press was not invented until 1436, and until that time, the scriptures were on scrolls and parchment.

The commission of this particular Bible carries extra significance because up until this point, England had been Catholic and the Catholic church printed the Bible only in Latin, which could not be read by commoners.  The protestant reformers, led by King Henry, made it part of their mission to make the Bible more accessible to the masses by printing it in English.

This is a sheet from the appraiser, which lists what is said on the title page. It's easier to read than the fancy cursive script.

This is a sheet from the appraiser, which lists what is said on the title page. It’s easier to read than the fancy cursive script.

The first edition was published in 1539. My library has a copy of the third edition. But our copy is one of the rarer copies in existence, because it still contains the original five title pages. This website explains the image below.

Our copy is one of the only left to include this fascinating illustration title page

Our copy is one of the only copies left to include this fascinating illustration title page

The  first edition of this Bible was printed five years after King Henry broke with the Catholic Church, creating his own Church of England, and put himself at the head of the Church. In the span of time between the creation of the Church of England and the printing of this Bible, King Henry married Anne Boleyn, fathered Elizabeth the first, executed Anne, married Lady Jane Seymour, fathered King Edward VI, saw Queen Jane die after childbirth, married Anne of Cleves, annulled that marriage,  and was either married to or getting ready to marry his fifth wife, Katherine Howard-whose head would also eventually end up on the chopping block. If you think the reality TV show “Survivor” is hard, you should read more about the Tudor era of English history. It’s downright terrifying.

Despite the bloody and contentious history, this book spoke to me the moment I opened it’s covers-not because of Henry and, I’m sorry to say for my pastor’s sake, not because of it’s religious text. The most breathtaking and fascinating parts were the notes scribbled into the margins of the book, in quill and ink.

This writing in the book of Genesis says, "I am, dear madame, your humble servant to command. Rob Dixon." Heart melting...

This writing says, “I am, dear madame, your humble servant to command. Rob Dixon.” Heart melting…

I can't decifer exactly what this says except. "Unto no image" and it's signed Ann at the end.

I can’t decifer exactly what this says except. “Unto no image” and it’s signed Ann at the end.

This note seems to mark the sale of something for 10 shillings (about 70 cents in current US money) in 1664.

This note seems to mark the sale of something for 10 shillings (about 70 cents in current US money) in 1664.

Phillip Tomkinson signed his name.  No date.

Phillip Tomkinson signed his name. No date.

I tried translating it.  I got "Adversity and shelter, drinke, not pleasant at home without the baggage of a country in our sojourn. Here speak of the doctrine of pre Archias."

I tried translating it. I got “Adversity and shelter, drinke, not pleasant at home without the baggage of a country in our sojourn. Here speak of the doctrine of pre Archias.”

An entire page of notes taken on a blank page.  This section is about the Prophets.

An entire page of notes taken on a blank page. This section is about the Prophets.

More scribbled notes. The drawing perplexes me.  What the heck is that?

More scribbled notes. The drawing perplexes me. What the heck is that?

There's also a fabulous liturgical calendar page with various dates scribbled in, including something notable for 1557.

There’s also a fabulous liturgical calendar page with various dates scribbled in, including something notable for 1557.

Stay tuned for some Tudor-era recipes. I think it’s about time and I’m inspired now.

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